Can We Trust What the Gospels Say About Jesus

Can We Trust What the Gospels Say About Jesus

Andrew Errington
from 2 reviews

A short but thorough booklet dealing with the origins of the gospel stories about Jesus.

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Description

Jesus is an amazing man; he changed human history. But can you really know anything about him? Hasn't the Bible been changed over the centuries? Andrew Errington takes a careful and balanced look at some of the big questions surrounding the history of Jesus. This immensely readable booklet is full of evidence, challenges and surprising conclusions. For example, did you know that the authors of the Bible were biased, and that's precisely why you should read them?

Short enough to read quickly but long enough to tackle the big questions, this booklet deals with the origins of the gospel stories about Jesus; how they got to us today; and evidence of Jesus from outside the Bible. If you've ever wondered what the Bible actually is, or why it's worth reading, then this is for you.

Product details

Contents

  • Introduction: History, Jesus and the Gospels
  • Part I: Where did the Gospels come from?
  • Part II: What are the Gospels?
  • Part III: What evidence is there?
  • Conclusion: The trustworthiness of the Gospels
  • Appendix: Other takes on Jesus

Specification

Author Andrew Errington
ISBN 9781921441424
Format Paperback
First published September 2009
Dimensions 129mm x 198mm x 2mm
Language English
Pages 32
Publisher Matthias Media
Customer reviews

“Sound Evidential Resource”

Whilst running a Design for Discipleship course I bought this light read for the students. It is packed with sound evidence and I feel that they will find it useful in conversations, and to occasionally refresh their understanding. This is how I was introduced to it a couple of years ago.


09/12/2013

“Brilliant”

‘Can we trust what the Gospels say about Jesus’ is a short (31 page) but comprehensive book by
Andrew Errington.

The book is not an academic treatise; the text is plain and simple and ideal to give to the ‘man in the street’ who doubts the accuracy of the Gospels. It is also very honest and tackles issues head-on.
It covers:

History. Jesus and the Gospels - ‘Christians believe that the world is different because of who Jesus
really was, because of the things he really did and because of what really happened to him after he died.
It’s only because of what it says about history that Christianity has anything to say about life today.

Where did the Gospels come from? - How did they get to us? How did they get written? What do we know about the authors? Conclusion – ‘the Gospels can be trusted.’

What are the Gospels? - Carefully constructed stories that don’t try to say everything. Written from a point of view (they are not neutral) Conclusion – ‘Matthew, Mark, Luke and John are four ‘takes’ on Jesus. Their authors clearly believed that they were good takes, and that they show us Jesus as he really was.’

What evidence is there? - External evidence: Greco-Roman and non-Christian Jewish references to Jesus, archaeological and geographical evidence. Internal evidence: Agreement; Reasonable disagreement; the evidence of embarrassment. Conclusion – ‘there is every reason to think that the authors of the Gospels have followed through on their intentions to tell the truth about Jesus.’

Conclusion – The trustworthiness of the Gospels - The author has argued that ‘there are solid grounds for regarding the Gospels as historically reliable’ that we can ‘trust what Matthew, Mark, Luke and John said about Jesus …it means that you and I, (and the sceptical person I intend to give this book to)
2000 years later, can read the Gospels and genuinely know the truth about Jesus ... the real, historical Jesus isn’t just a character of interest for academics. His actions and words have changed the lives of millions of people down through the ages. You’d be mad not to take up the chance to discover him for yourself.’ I couldn’t agree more.

Other takes on Jesus – the Appendix demolishes claims that the ‘real Jesus’ is to be found in other sources, including two of the ‘other gospels’ (the Gospel of Philip and the Gospel of Mary) discussed in Dan Brown’s ‘The Da Vinci Code.’

For those interested in further study, there are suggestions for further reading.

The recommendation on the back cover of the book states that:
JESUS is an amazing man, he changed human history. But can you really know anything about him?
Hasn’t the Bible been changed over the centuries? Andrew Errington takes a careful and balanced look at some of the big questions surrounding the history of Jesus. This immensely readable booklet is full of evidence, challenges and surprising conclusions For example, did you know that the authors of the Bible were biased, and that’s precisely why you should read them?

Short enough to read quickly but long enough to tackle the big questions, this booklet deals with the origins of the gospel stories about Jesus, how they got to us today, and evidence for Jesus from outside the Bible. If you you’ve ever wondered what the Bible actually is, or why its worth reading, then this is for you.

Of course Matthiasmedia is biased and would say this to sell the book. I am not biased. I heartily recommend this book as a must-read. It provides excellent answers for sceptical family members, friends or colleagues who do not trust what the Gospels say about Jesus.


05/02/2010

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Can We Trust What the Gospels Say About Jesus | Andrew Errington | £2.50 £2.00